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CLAGHORN’S THE NAME

CLAGHORN’S THE NAME BUT CALL HIM KENNY – DELMAR, THAT IS BY TWEED BROWN THAT grinning whirlwind whipping in and out of Radio City isn’t a refuge from the sound effects cabinet. On closer inspection it will prove to be a bushy-haired young gent out of Boston by name of Kenneth Frederick Fay Howard, attempting to keep up with his radio commitments. This bustling Bostonian has ample reason to rush, for under the professional name of “Kenny Delmar” his actor-announcer talents are in such demand as to require would be sponsors to queue up for considerable distances. Not only is Delmar sought for more announcing chores than he can shake a Social Security card at, but his brainchild, “Senator Claghorn” (That’s a joke, son!) is currently the “hottest” thing in radio. If you don’t immediately identify “the Senator” as the unreconstructed tenant of Allen’s Alley—on the Fred Allen program—then he is the person responsible for normally sane citizens from Wenatchee, Wash.,

The True Story of— Phil Harris linked with Dozens of Hollywood Glamor Girls... but just one girl really counts!

  The True Story of— GOSSIPS LINK PHIL HARRIS WITH DOZENS OF HOLLYWOOD GLAMOR GIRLS. BUT JUST ONE GIRL REALLY COUNTS! HE TAKES the romantic “rap” from Master Kidder Jack Benny on his fictitious “dates” with tawny-haired GingerRogers and wisecracking Carole Lombard , when a Hollywood blonde with a husky voice is the one who really makes his heart turn somersaults. And he’s never met her! That’s the “true story” of curly-haired Phil Harris ’ big “dates” . . . that is, it’s almost the story. The other half has to do with a five-foot, four-inch brunet. A gal who swims and dances and sings and handles the piano ivories in a way that should put her in her husband’s band. You’re right. She’s Mrs. Phil Harris . And has been for nine years. It takes the romantic starch out of the Sunday night kidding that Swingmaster Harris, with the broad, beaming smile, is subjected to. But there’s more to this romance-and-rhythm story than that. when I saw her.” Good sport that

Steve Allen, himself

    Steve Allen , himself Radio TV Mirror Headliner “I’M THE happy victim of a series of lucky circumstances.” That’s Steve Allen talking, explaining how he happened to get where he is. “Nothing I ever did was the result of any special planning ahead, but each thing led to something better. Even the jobs I was fired from, the shows I wanted but didn’t get, the zany stunts I took a chance on doing. I’ve seemed to stumble onto my successes, and luck has had a lot to do with it.” It started when Steve quit Arizona State Teachers’ College to take a job as a radio announcer for KOY in Phoenix. He hadn’t any idea that he was picking up so much all-round knowledge of show business, including those little trick things that keep an audience interested. Practically everything he does now he began to learn then . When, some years ago, he got a six-night-a-week midnight show over radio station KNX in Hollywood , that was another piece of luck. Steve’s was the only comed

New Faces

New Faces WILLIAM BENDIX has a special talent for looking dumb and “acting” smart. Took his movie initiation in 1941, and did his first leading part in “Wake Island” last year. Left: In role for Paramount’s “China.” Below:  “Records can be broken,” says Bill <BENDIX in a scene from “China,” with Loretta Young , star of film > —Paramount  Photo by Hai A. McAlpin                                                                    —Bruce Bailey Photo WILLIAM BENDIX First Job Was That of Batboy for New York Giant AS “SMACKSIE” from Brooklyn to his Leatherneck pals in “Wake Island,” Bill Bendix more than justified Paramount officials officials’ confidence in his ability as an actor. But first time Bendix faced a movie camera, he admits has was “panic stricken.” That was when M-G-M signed him for the role of tavern -keeper in “Woman of the Year.” He was on Broadway rehearsing for a new show at the time, and flew to Hollywood to make his picture bow. Recallin

C. B. Pills the Strings—

C. B. Pills the Strings— Here’s How Lux Radio Theater Maintains Top Rating Year After Year LUCK and long shots play no part in the year-after-year success of “ Lux Radio Theater .” The consistently high quality of its productions is due in great measure to C . B. DeMille, wizard producer, with his million-dollar-star contacts in Hollywood and his uncanny ability to choose plays that are adaptable to the medium of radio entertainment. Furthermore, C. B. knows how to pick assistants—men like Charlie Forsyth, who handles all the sound-effects  heard on the show; George Wells, radio playwriter who does  the scripts. For every play from stage and screen must be “tailored” to fit radio technique. And Wells has been doing the job ever since the first airing nine years ago. Typical of the all-star casts Mr. DeMille picks for the show is the trio shown on these pages. Flawless performances given mean not only vision on the part of the producer and his helpers, but en

PINT SIZE—BUT POWERFUL . . .

  PINT SIZE—BUT POWERFUL . . . Unique is the word for Johnny. Johnny is radio’s only vocal trademark. Johnny is the only holder of a life-time contract in the history of radio. Johnny is only 47 inches high and weighs only 59 pounds. Johnny is the only name he goes by—and to millions of Americans. That’s right—Johnny is the lad who three times a week gives his famous call over two of our major networks. For little man, Johnny isn’t doing badly. His job pays him $20,000 a year, plus a good deal of fame. The audition which netted him all this was just unique as his career. Johnny was a bellhop in New York hotel. Eleven years ago, a certain Milton Biow —advertising man and genius of a sort—passed through the hotel and got an idea. He had Johnny page a non-existent Mr. Philip Morris . Of course, Johnny paged Mr. Morris without results, but when he reported his failure to Mr. Biow —he found it turned into phenomenal success . He got the contract for the cigarette account, whi

Bogart, Bacall Sign For New Radio Series

The Deseret News – Jan 9, 1951 Bogart, Bacall Sign For New Radio Series Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall, in private life Mr. and Mrs., have been signed to co-star in a new radio adventure series, “ Bold Venture .” The Bogarts’ contract is for 52 half-hour programs, with options up to five years. Production costs for each half hour show, which in addition to the stars will feature original background music by David Rose and orchestra, will be approximately $ 12,000. The Bogarts who, in addition to their minimum fee, will receive a royalty on sales, are expected to realize $5000 a week from the show during the first year. National release date for the program has been set at March 26. In the show itself, already being taped in Hollywood studios, Bogart and Bacall do not play Mr. and Mrs. roles. He owns an inn and an all-purpose boat named “ Bold Venture ” which she is his ward and love interest. Each half-hour episode is a complete story in itself.

Building a Bob Hope Radio Show

Sunday, December 27, 1942       THE MILWAUKEE JOURNAL—SCREEN and RADIO Building a Bob Hope Radio Show Comedy half hour is put together piece by piece, rough edges trimmed By Kate Holliday “THAT was a boff . Leave it in!” Such a cry might barrel through the NBC control room in Hollywood at a preview of Bob Hope’s radio show . A boff, for your information, is a joke so funny it brings a belly laugh. What is a radio show preview? Just that: A show before a show—to which the public is invited and at which Hope and company test the merit of gags they have concocted. It explains, to a large degree, Hope’s continued success. A comedian’s life is usually not a happy one, evidence to the contrary. A guy like Hope, say, doesn’t just amble toward a microphone come Tuesday night and be funny. Instead, he builds his show gag by gag . It all begins on the Thursday or Friday of the week preceding the program. At that point Hope and his seven writers meet and discu

She’s Really Anything but a Dope (Gracie Allen)

The Milwaukee Journal – Oct 4, 1942 She’s Really Anything but a Dope By Carlton Cheney DOWN through the ages countless millions of words have been uttered or written about the manifold advantages of being smart. But one may look in vain to the advice of sages and pundits for single observation , a friendly tip extolling the manifold virtues of being dumb. This, it appears, is a gross and deplorable omission which we right here and now set about to correct, being moved to the effort by a visit we paid the other day to the home of Gracie Allen , that darling dunce of the air waves , on the eve of her return to radio with husband-partner George Burns . Gracie and George , as you no doubt know, have been taking a summer vacation, but they will be back on the ether Tuesday night, again supported by Paul Whiteman and his orchestra; Jimmy Cash, the Arkansas Singer; Bill Goodwin, announcer and stooge, and Clarence Nash as Herman the Duck. White the show this season w