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THE SQUEAKING DOOR (Inner Sanctum)

THE SQUEAKING DOOR INNER SANCTUM MYSTERY, WORKSHOP OF BLOOD AND HORROR, SPECIALIZES IN WHOLESALE MURDER TUNE IN SUN. 8:30 P.M. E.W.T. (BLUE) When Inner Sanctum Mystery was only a few weeks old, a woman listener sent a can of oil to the producer, Himan Brown . Said she did not mind the blood and ghoulishness of the program, but that darned door sent shivers down her spine. That was intentional, of course, and it is unnecessary to add that nothing has been done about oiling the ghostly hinges since the program was born, January 7, 1941. It is estimated that fifteen million spines are chilled by the blood-curdling slaughter that takes place weekly on this terror-show. It began with an accidental thought that occurred to Producer Himan Brown while he was browsing around the sound effects shop for unusual backgrounds to incorporate in another of his programs. He happened upon a terrifyingly squeaking door, made a mental note to use it some day, and did when asked b

Inner Sanctum Host Isn't a Bad Guy If you Look at Him Out of Character

The Pittsburgh Press- Jul 19, 1942 Inner Sanctum Host Isn’t a Bad Guy If You Look at Him Out of Character He’s been a caddy, a soda jerk, a bus boy, an insurance salesman, a bank teller and a tennis pro. His favorite composer is Sibelius, he is a profound a thinker as a college professor but he usually dresses in casual tweeds and sport jackets. His friends sum him up simply as “a heck of a swell guy.” That’s Raymond Edward Johnson, much-heard NBC actor. Currently Ray is heard in “The Story of Bess Johnson” as Clyde. Bess’ outspoken but sincere’ friend. That’s pretty close to real life, too. The real Bess Johnson (no relation) gave Ray his first radio job some years back. He also is “The Host” on the Blue Network’s “ Inner Sanctum ” and his fan mail brings carloads of oil cans for the famous squeaking door that opens the program *         *        * The first radio job Ray landed was in “Today’s Children ,” which ran for more than five years. He then played a le