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HOW BING CROSBY WILL LIVE ON $ 25,000 A YEAR

  HOW BING CROSBY WILL LIVE ON $ 25,000 A YEAR WHEN the President urged a wartime $25,000 limit on incomes, he sent shudders along many famous Hollywood spines. Pencils squeaked far into the night as name stars tried to squeeze six-figure budgets under the $25,000 ceiling. But Bing Crosby can take the cut without a whimper. His huge income has never turned his head. He’s a regular fellow with a sincere love of things. Bing’s non-working life centers around his family, his home, his horses and his wide range of sports interests. He lives well and owns two comfortable houses. Wife Dixie Lee manages them with very few servants, for home to the Crosbys is not a cross between Grand Hotel and Buckingham Palace. Bing and Dixie are home bodies , and the bright spots see them seldom. Bing wants his four boys to be real kids. He may splurge in such matters as playground equipment for them, but he keeps them in public school. Bing’s strictly an “old hat and slacks” d

'Sh! I Can't Tell That One on the Air'

The Milwaukee Journal – Oct 13, 1940    Browse this newspaper>>            Browse all newspapers>> 'Sh! I Can't Tell That One on the Air' By Edgar A. Thompson Of The Journal Staff THE funny little guy in “soup and fish” pointed his funny nose at the buffet luncheon and plowed through the movie and radio stars at the “Knute Rockne” premiere at South Bend, Ind. “Oh! There’s Mrs. Hope!” screamed a woman and she rushed up to him with a friend. “Look, George! Here’s Bob Hope ! Ha, ha, ha, isn’t he funny for us Bob – we enjoy your broadcasts so much but do he funny for us now!” Hope gave her that “I just missed a three inch putt” look and said, “I’m sorry, lady, but I’m only human and right now I’m hungry and interested in my stomach and not my belly to beans, ham, potato salad, bread, olives celery and a fork. I caught him between the bread and olives. We shook hands and I got the buttered, side of the bread. So I said: “Look, Bob, how do

Bob Hope Is Radio’s Newest Comedy Star

The Milwaukee Journal – Jun 5, 1938 Bob Hope is scheduled to be radio’s next topline comedian. Following successes on “Your Hollywood Parade,” Bob is set to take the place of the “Mickey Mouse” show next fall. He will get one of NBC ’s top Sunday night periods. The Milwaukee Journal – Jun 5, 1938 Bob Hope Is Radio’s Newest Comedy Star BOB HOPE , comedian heard last on Dick Powell ’s “Your Hollywood Parade,” will be back in the fall—with a program of his own, according to west coast reports. Arrangements now are being made for Bob to replace the “Mickey Mouse” program on NBC next October. So—radio gets another new topline comedian. Actually, Bob Hope is no beginner. He is just about the last of the top row vaudeville and musical comedy stars to come over to radio. He has played in shows with Bea Lillie, Jimmie Durante , Ethel Merman, George Murphy, Fannie Brice, Bing Crosby and Eddie Cantor, all of whom preceded him to Hollywood and most of whom

THE WHISTLER schedule

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Spike Jones Obituary: May 1, 1965

The Deseret News – May 1, 1965 Spike Jones  Dies InBeverly Hills BEVERLY HILLS CALIF. (UPI)— Spike Jones , a madcap bandleader who made a fortune with his zany music, died Saturday at the age of 53 in his home here. Jones died shortly after midnight. A family spokesman said Jones died in his sleep. His wife, singer Helen Grayco, and a nurse were at his bedside. Miss Grayco said he complained of a headache Friday morning and his physician ordered him to take some medication. The nurse who lived at Jones’ residence summoned the doctor shortly before midnight when she noticed his pulse was irregular Jones died before the doctor arrived. TAKES RIDE Jones’ sister-in-law, Mrs. Teresa Digioia, said Jones was out for a car ride Friday afternoon and “was feeling fine at that time.” First reports indicated Jones died of a heard condition. He had been home from the Santa Monica Hospital three weeks. He was hospitalized March 30 with complication following an asthmatic att

Unveiling DUFFY’S TAVERN

The Milwaukee Journal – Jan 28, 1945 Unveiling  DUFFY’S TAVERN “ DUFFY’S TAVERN , where the elite meet to eat, Archie the manager speaking . . .” That’s Ed Gardner, Archie himself, who has got himself and his tavern into the movies after winning nation-wide laughter as a radio comedian (7:30 p. m. Fridays, WTMJ) Gardner is a former WPA worker who mangled English so intelligently that the radio industry figured he really was worth $5,000 a week. Hollywood raised the ante so the tavern, with its characters and free lunch, is now before the cameras at Paramount. Everybody from the radio show is there except Duffy himself, the disembodied voice who calls Archie on the phone. And it includes Clifton Finnegan, the well known moron; Eddie, the waiter, and the enchanting Miss Duffy herself. To give the hangout a little style, Paramount has chipped in with Bing Crosby and the four Crosby kids, Dorothy Lamour , Veronica Lake, Eddie Bracken , Victor Moore, Barry Sul

Remembering Fred Astaire

You see, every once in a while I suddenly find myself dancing. - Fred Astaire as Jerry Travers for the movie Top Hat Frederic Austerlitz , more popularly known as Fred Astaire , was an American choreographer, dancer, singer, and actor who became popular during the period known as the “silver screen” era of films. Getting Those Dancing Shoes On Fred was born on May 10, 1899 in Omaha, Nebraska. He was the younger child of Frederic and Johanna Austerlitz, with their daughter Adele as the older one. The family had their name anglicized to Astaire following the beginning of the First World War. They moved to the city of New York in 1904, so that Adele, who was a very passionate dancer, can pursue her education as a dancer.   While in New York, Fred came to know his true passions, one for dancing and other for horses. According to his mother, during those times when Fred just disappeared, he went to visit places that are important to horses. He knew every little thing tha

‘Actors Are Not Egotists’ by Jack Benny

The Milwaukee Journal – Feb 13, 1938   ‘Actors Are Not Egotists’ A Radio Comedian Turned Screen Actor Here Gives You His Evaluation of His Co-workers and, in the Benny Manner, Emerges With All Banners Flying in His Defense of This Maligned Profession By Jack Benny Jack Benny , as everybody but an unidentified man in French Indo-China knows, appears on NBC Sunday nights with his radio troupe. His next film for Paramount is called “Never Say Die.” HERE is something I’ve wanted to get off my chest for years, I expect to be given arguments about it. There will be many snorts of “Oh, yeah?” But a Benny never falters for mere snorts. He’s faced too many dead-on-their-seats audiences. I say actors as a class aren’t nearly so sold on themselves as nonprofessionals think. Here’s what I mean. An Irishman named Mike wanted to go for a sleigh ride but he didn’t have a sled. His friend Pat did Mike thought over the situation and he said to his wife “Sure it’s