Skip to main content

Posts

VITOR PERRIN

VITOR PERRIN—featured as Clay Brown on The Story of Holly Sloan, NBC, weekdays at 2:30, EST. Vick worked his way through the University of Wisconsin by being announcer, actor and producer on a local radio station; went to Hollywood, where his first job with NBC was attendant on their parking lot. He was soon made a staff announcer. In 1945 he freelanced as actor and announcer, lectured in radio at USC.
Recent posts

Say Hello To- BILL PERRY

Say Hello To- BILL PERRY—the tenor star of CBS’ Saturday Night Serenade, who started his career in Vanderbilt University by singing and playing the trombone in a band to earn money for tuition fees. After singing on a local station in Tennessee, he came to New York and made his network debut in 1933. Now he’s in his sixth year as star of the Saturday Night Serenade, and has missed only one broadcast. Bill is athletic, nearly six feet tall. His list of favorite recreations includes almost every type of rugged sport, and he attends every prizefight he can. His ambition is to be a concert singer like JohnCharles Thomas , but he dreads the thought of singing a season or two in the Metropolitan Opera , which would be necessary to reach that goal. 

BURNS AND ALLEN

The Milwaukee Journal – Jun 10, 1938 BURNS AND ALLEN THEY SANG AND DANCED IN VAUDEVILLE BEFORE GRACIE BECAME “DIZZY.” THEY BOTH PLAY GOLD—BUT SEPARATELY. PEOPLE LAUGH AT GRACIE NO MATTER WHAT SHE SAYS, EVEN WHEN MAKING PURCHASES. IT TAKES four men to keep GracieAllen “dizzy” – George Burns and three gagmen . . .Burns did it alone till he began to talk that way himself . . .they teamed first as a song and dance act in vaudeville . . . were married after trouping together for four year . . . became famous on radio . . .Gracie isn’t funny on movie sets . . . but people laugh at her anyway . . .she refers all interviewers to George . . . won’t answer questions herself . . . George handles all business matters . . . she never reads a script . . . George teaches her the lines—believes she’ll be funnier if she doesn’t know what’s going on. . .George is an expert golfer. . . Gracie a rank amateur. . . he took her golfing one day . . . she made a hole-in-one . . . tha

Hollywood News By JACK QUIGG

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON, JULY 11, 1951              Times-Daily Hollywood News By JACK QUIGG (For Bob Thomas) HOLLYWOOD, (AP), -- Silence is golden, especially if you can keep mum as artfully as Gale Gordon . Mr. Gordon, a handsome, fortyish gentleman with a Clark Gable moustache and the trace of a British accent, earns as much as a lot of movie stars simply by keeping his mouth closed—at the right time. One of Hollywood ’s top radio actors he is known in the trade as “The Master Of The Eloquent Pause.” If you don’t quite place his name, you undoubtedly know him by voice if you’re any kind of radio fan—he appears regularly on seven big network programs. Gordon is: Mayor Latrivia on the “ FibberMcGee and Molly ” show: back president Rudolph Atterbury on “ My Favorite Husband ”; school principal Osgood Conklin on “ Our Miss Brooks ”; Mr. Scott, head of RCA, on the Phil Harris-Alice Faye show ; Mr. Merryweather, Ronald Colman ’s rich friend on “ Halls Of Ivy ”;

Signal Oil, Sponsor of The Whistler

It all began by a terrible freeze in the winter of 1921. An avocado, orange and lemon grower Sam Mosher had lost all his crops and was going broke. At this same time one of the largest oil fields ever found in CA. had just been discovered at Signal Hill near Long Beach. Sam Mosher along with many other curious people went to see what was going on. As Sam watched the wildcat wells being exposed he noticed all the fires at the tops and the natural gasoline that was going up into the atmosphere. He thought what if I could capture that stuff and sell it. It was all history after that. In this first week I will cover this part a little each day from 1922 to 1931. Most people think of Signal as the company with the stop light symbol. Sam Mosher had one problem with his idea to capture this natural gasoline he needed $4000 to get the idea running and one of the large companies let him tap into there well. So he borrowed towards his inheritance from his mother because his dad thought h

Sullivan is Title Role

Sullivan is Title Role Title role this semester is handled by Barry Sullivan , who took the Dick Powell characterization. The he lacked the suavity and ├ęclat of Powell, Sullivan rend a tough line convincingly. He was sufficiently cocky (“ I had to work every angle and, believe me, I know them all”) to make the listener wish he’d get this head bashed in, and he did, in beat Rogue tradition, the inevitable lacing was followed by Rogue’s usual fanciful trip to Cloud where alter ego Euger, cackling thru the filter mike, exchanged badinage with the chastened detective. It’s an effective gimmick and a good trademark. Excellent pacing, fluid transitions and neat use of background music by Max Stelner and him small ensemble garnished the production. Directora Charles Vanda and Jack Lyman provided the touch most essential to whodunnits. They kept the action flowing rapidly. The lesser characterization were strictly out of the ditto machine, but were no worse than those in the usua

Radio rights to Dorothy Dix have been acquired by Frank Cooper Associate

Radio rights to Dorothy Dix have been acquired by Frank Cooper Associates, who have already done three experimental audition records. Miss Dix, who started advising the lovelorn in 1896, is correctly syndicated in 216 newspapers . . . Lester Gottliab, Young & Rublcam talent and programing exec, left New York Friday (16) for the Coast to help launch the agency’s top shows this fall, including Fannie Brice, Duffy’s Tavern, Joan Davis , Ginny Simms, Allan Young, etc . . . Dick Powell-Texace Show, Rogue’s Gallery, is about set with conirects to be okayed Monday or Tuesday { 18 or 20} . . . WNAZ, Sarange Lake, N, Y . . . affiliate of ABC, granted a construction permit by the FCC to operate with 230 watis time on 1450 AC. Now a 100 walter, station will make the switch about October 1.